A series of posts based on the introduction to “The Everything Healthy Tea Book”, page 10.

 

Tea Myth #1

Tea doesn’t go bad. I have teabags that are several years old and still taste fine.

[ File # csp3884446, License # 1241820 ] Licensed through http://www.canstockphoto.com in accordance with the End User License Agreement (http://www.canstockphoto.com/legal.php) (c) Can Stock Photo Inc. / phbcz

                  (c) Can Stock Photo Inc. / phbcz

Do you have a cupboard filled with tea boxes and canisters that date back to . . . well . . . let’s say . . . longer than you can remember. And you can even brew a fairly decent tasting cup of something that looks and tastes pretty good. Almost like it did when it was new and fresh. And, if all you want is a bit of colored water, a sweet flavor and pleasant aroma, you can brew an attractive cup.

But, is that all you want from a beverage? From any beverage? Or from anything in your diet?

The fact is that tea does deteriorate over time. The organic compounds in tea leaves that are most beneficial degrade with time – a process that begins during some of the stages of processing. Whole leaves degrade as they are cut into particles small enough to fill teabags. But all tea degrades with improper packaging allowing exposure to air, light and moisture. It loses the antioxidant properties, the L-theanine, the vitamins and minerals and the caffeine as well as flavors.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

A freshly picked tea leaf, filled with flavor and health benefits.

A freshly picked tea leaf, filled with flavor and health benefits.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . 

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

~~~

How can you tell if a tea goes bad?

Most of these changes are difficult for the average tea consumer to detect. It may taste a little flat – not as bright and crisp as when it was fresh. Or it could be a little thin, requiring more tea to brew as satisfying a cup. If the tea in your cupboard absorbs moisture and is then kept for a time without being brewed quickly, it can develop an unpleasant muskiness or mold.

So, the life of your tea depends on the quality of tea you purchase AND the way you store it in your home AND how long you keep it.

 

~~~

Is there anything you can do with old tea other than throwing it away?

Yes! If you’re a gardener, tea makes incredible compost. Paper teabags do decompose but you don’t want to add any of the protective wrappers. Whole leaves can be sprinkled on top of the soil in your flower beds. Roses especially love tea. And consider the possibility of adding it to a soil mix for potted house plants.

There may also be enough color left in the tea to make a “dye” to color paper, giving it an antiqued look if it’s soaked, then left to dry. Fabric can also be dyed with tea.

These are just a few ideas for now but many more suggestions will be posted in the category, “Other Uses For Tea”.

~~~

 


 

A series of posts based on the introduction to “The Everything Healthy Tea Book”, page 10.

Everything-healthy-tea-cover

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

The Everything Healthy Tea Book

Written by Babette Donaldson      

Published by Adams Media

An introduction to the world’s teas and their healing qualities!

A relaxing cup of tea is a soothing way to improve your health, lighten your mood, increase your metabolism, or boost your energy. Tea has so many health benefits, from preventing cardiovascular disease to burning calories, it’s no wonder so many people are choosing this classic beverage over coffee and carbonated soft drinks. . . . .

With essential advice on brewing the perfect cup and storing your tea, The Everything Healthy Tea Book will be your go-to reference for all things tea!   (excerpt from Amazon product description)